patrick leddin

Inspiration

FOCUS

It sounds obvious, but most of us have a way of piling up “must-do” priorities, making it impossible to do a very good job on any of them. One recipe for disengaging people is to overwhelm them with things to do, all of which are “Job 1” and “key priorities” and “top-of-the-list.”

But if you unleash people to focus on one, two, or three wildly important goals—no more—they will sense the significance of what they’re doing and they’ll have a chance to win. There is tremendous power in focus. As you prioritize your goals, think about those things that must be done or nothing else matters, focus on those true priorities, and move lower priorities to the back burner.

The Power of Purpose: Discover (Rediscover) Your Purpose

A key habit of any true leader is to have a clear “end in mind,” a vision or mission that inspires and energizes people. It also means having a clear purpose in mind for everything true leaders do—initiatives, projects, meetings. It’s based on the simple principle of knowing one’s destination early; even if one fall short, there is movement in the right direction.

Is it Time to Prune

To flourish we must let go of things that hinder us. This means that we sometimes have to let of good things too. Perhaps even friends, mindsets, fears, and how we spend our time, money, and other resources. Sometimes our lives need a bit of pruning.

What do you need to cut back on in order to create new growth?

What One Olympian Teaches Us About Teamwork (Hint: It’s Not About Medals, Pence, or Xanax)

Olympic figure skater Adam Rippon has captured the attention of many over the last couple of weeks. You are likely aware of one, if not several things, that put Rippon into the public eye.

To me, the one thing that truly stands out about Rippon isn’t the thing that garnered most attention…

It’s Not About Medals

Ode to a Project Manager

You rush from the meeting with a new project assigned,

Less than an hour in charge, yet your three days behind.

 

On your computer you create a new file folder,

Soon to be filled with interviews of each stakeholder.

 

One executive thinks the project is the most important ever,

Collision of Autobiographies

In the United States alone, some 94% of annual car accidents (over 2 million of them) are the result of human error (U.S., DOT). This staggering statistic is a huge catalyst for the self-driving car movement.

I’m cautiously optimistic that self-driving vehicles will save many lives in the future.

How to Finish 2017 Stronger Than Ever

December is here and with it comes a flurry of activities.

It’s easy to get swept up in the end-of-the-year frenzy.

Frankly, left to my own devices, I’m likely to ring in the New Year with a twinge of disappointment, if I don’t accomplish a couple of goals.

As I think about whether or not I want to invest the time and energy to get them across the finish line by yearend, I’m haunted by the following quote:

How a 13-Year-Old Can Teach You to Rethink Failure

Earlier this year, I wrote an article about Lucy Westlake and her dad (Rodney) climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa.

The post discussed the importance of winning and, more importantly, winning with others as opposed to winning at the expense of others.

“Winning often begets winning, but winning is at its very best when you bring someone or something else with you along the way.”

What You Can Learn from Baseball’s Great Experiment

The June 30, 2014 Sports Illustrated cover featured a photo of Houston Astros’ outfielder, George Springer. The headline, “Your 2017 World Series Champs: An Unprecedented Look at How a Franchise is Going Beyond ‘Moneyball‘ to Build the Next Big Thing…”

This was a bold proclamation by author, Ben Reiter, who called it Baseball’s Great Experiment. At the time his prediction seemed far-fetched if not outright ludicrous. After all, the Astros had just finished three straight seasons as the dwellers at the bottom of the standings.